Episode #17: “Happy Star Trek Day!”

In this episode Mark wishes a very happy birthday to his favourite television series and film franchise: ‘Star Trek’, created by Gene Roddenberry, which premiered on the U.S. television station NBC on September 8, 1966, which has boldly grown to become a cultural phenomenon all around the world. Mark talks about what “Star Trek” means to him and what it is about the franchise that has kept him a fan of it since he was a child. And Mark also recites his poem “Beam me up!”. Live Long and Prosper! 🖖

The Mark Hastings Experience – Season 3, Episode #2: “Quentin Tarantino – A Tribute”

In this episode Mark talks about one of his favourite film writers and directors: “Quentin Tarantino” – whose films he is currently in the process of rewatching the films of.

My Poem “It’s good to be back”

Back in the seat, back in the theatre,
back to an experience that I have not
had in what seems like years…
back to where I always enjoy returning to…
back to the place with sparkles on the floor,
back to where the lights are always bright,
back to where there is always the smell
of sweetness in the air,
back to where there are always
refreshments to be had that sometimes
enhance the movie-going
and movie-watching entertainment show
that anybody and everybody who has
ever gone to the cinema is used to…
back to looking at a film
being projected onto a big screen…
back to seeing the illuminated pink and blue
kiosk logo for Ben & Jerry’s ice-cream…
back to the darkness where the power
of imagination always comes alive…
back to the giant room of surround sound…
back to the place where I have on occasion
felt like I were floating in space,
traveling at the speed of light,
or on a voyage to the moon and back…
back to a place that sometimes
feels like we have been found…
back to the place where I like to be
shown something I have never seen before…
back to the past, back to the present,
back to the future – it’s good to be back
enjoying a new motion picture
back at the cinema.

My Poem “Run Jesse, run!”

It is the hallmark of a great film,
a great television show,
a great play, a great writer,
a great cast, a great production staff,
a great actor portraying
a great and complex protagonist,
who by the great gift of their craft
is able to make us –
the viewer, the audience –
care for them, accept them,
and become emotional invested and involved
in the story and in the journey
of the characters that we follow
from the second that we first see them
all the way to the last moments
of the last chapter and finale
that will ultimately – hopefully –
deliver a satisfying conclusion
that makes the journey that you
have taken with these familiar
characters worth all the time,
all the energy, and all the thought
that you committed to them
over the hours, the days,
the months, perhaps even the years
that it has taken to reach the end credits.

It can sometimes be hard to find
an ending that ticks all the boxes,
that answers all the questions,
that wraps up all the dangling threads
that remain to be addressed
and given a reason for why
they were not connected to the
greater narrative that underpins
everything that is a part
of the ultimate story being told…
in any given story it is always
out of the hands of the writer
and the author which part of an ongoing
story people will respond to and why –
sometimes it is the simplest
and the smallest of plot points
that resonate the most
and which over time become
what people remember the most,
as if what they saw shined like gold.

It is always a test for an audience
when an author creates
a character and they put them
through things that push them to their limits
and they change them in ways
that are hard to watch,
and it can sometimes be hard for people
to continue to empathize with
a certain character when they
start to behave in morally
questionable ways of being…
quite frequently, in some of the best
stories ever told, an audience gets
to watch the evolution of
a protagonist into an antagonist,
the hunter into the hunted,
the wronged into the redeemed –
and vice versa –
and the once imprisoned against
their will make their getaway
and run for the hills and away
from all that they are leaving behind –
like the character of Jesse Pinkman
driving like a bat out of hell
in his black and red ‘El Camino’
away from his past and towards
a future that not even he knows.

“The average person looking at someone doing evil or wrong wants the person to get away with it. I think it’s the most amazing instinct. The audience can’t bear the suspense of the person being discovered. “Hurry up! Quick! You’re going to be caught!” – Alfred Hitchcock