My Poem “Run Jesse, run!”

It is the hallmark of a great film,
a great television show,
a great play, a great writer,
a great cast, a great production staff,
a great actor portraying
a great and complex protagonist,
who by the great gift of their craft
is able to make us –
the viewer, the audience –
care for them, accept them,
and become emotional invested and involved
in the story and in the journey
of the characters that we follow
from the second that we first see them
all the way to the last moments
of the last chapter and finale
that will ultimately – hopefully –
deliver a satisfying conclusion
that makes the journey that you
have taken with these familiar
characters worth all the time,
all the energy, and all the thought
that you committed to them
over the hours, the days,
the months, perhaps even the years
that it has taken to reach the end credits.

It can sometimes be hard to find
an ending that ticks all the boxes,
that answers all the questions,
that wraps up all the dangling threads
that remain to be addressed
and given a reason for why
they were not connected to the
greater narrative that underpins
everything that is a part
of the ultimate story being told…
in any given story it is always
out of the hands of the writer
and the author which part of an ongoing
story people will respond to and why –
sometimes it is the simplest
and the smallest of plot points
that resonate the most
and which over time become
what people remember the most,
as if what they saw shined like gold.

It is always a test for an audience
when an author creates
a character and they put them
through things that push them to their limits
and they change them in ways
that are hard to watch,
and it can sometimes be hard for people
to continue to empathize with
a certain character when they
start to behave in morally
questionable ways of being…
quite frequently, in some of the best
stories ever told, an audience gets
to watch the evolution of
a protagonist into an antagonist,
the hunter into the hunted,
the wronged into the redeemed –
and vice versa –
and the once imprisoned against
their will make their getaway
and run for the hills and away
from all that they are leaving behind –
like the character of Jesse Pinkman
driving like a bat out of hell
in his black and red ‘El Camino’
away from his past and towards
a future that not even he knows.

“The average person looking at someone doing evil or wrong wants the person to get away with it. I think it’s the most amazing instinct. The audience can’t bear the suspense of the person being discovered. “Hurry up! Quick! You’re going to be caught!” – Alfred Hitchcock

My Poem “Iconic Vehicles”

There were so many times
while growing up
when I would stare at my television screen
and daydream that I could be the pilot
or the driver of so many of the vehicles
that I saw the heroes of my favourite
movies and television shows
driving fast and flying high with:
from Doc Brown’s Time Machine DMC DeLorean
from the Back to the Future trilogy,
to the Pontiac Firebird of The Bandit
from the Smokey and The Bandit films;
from Michael Knight’s talking Trans Am KITT,
to Batman’s Batmobile
from Tim Burton’s 1989 film
that brought The Dark Knight
to life like never before…
from Luke Skywalker’s X-wing fighter
and Han Solo’s Millenium Falcon
from the Star Wars franchise,
to the F-14 Tomcat piloted by
Tom Cruise’s character
Maverick in Top Gun;
from the Starship Enterprise’s
captained by Captain James T. Kirk
and Captain Jean-Luc Picard,
to the TARDIS of The Doctor
from Doctor Who…
from the motorbike Street Hawk,
to the advanced helicopter AirWolf;
from the A-Team’s black GMC Vantura
van with it’s red stripe
that ran along the side,
to the converted white hearse/ambulance
“Ecto-1” that was the preferred
means of travelling the city streets
of New York City by the Ghostbusters;
from the advanced submersible vehicles
that ventured and had adventures
below the waves of the sea,
like SeaQuest DSV, Thunderbird 4,
and of course Stingray…
I spent countless hours
while growing up
following the adventures
of all my on-screen heroes
and being taken on a ride
at full-speed to places
that inflamed my imagination –
and, to this day, those same cars,
those same spaceships,
those same aircraft,
those same iconic vehicles
of the protagonists
of some of my favourite fictional
childhood screen idols
still fill me with a sense of wonder
and they will never stop being
brought back to life
by the power of my imagination
and the vivid memories
that I still have of my childhood.